STYLE: BECAUSE YOU’RE HAIR IS REALLY BORING, JAYNE.

I really need to change my hair-style and I’ve been thinking about it for a while. I’m thinking short and unruly. But since I’m quite unruly already, I’m not sure if the added benefit of “unruly hair” would really promote my image. I may just end up looking homeless. Choosing a haircut or perm is kind of like choosing a cider at a hipster bar – there are too many to choose from, you’re not really sure what you’re getting in to and you may either regret it or become addicted to it.

Anyway, to try to help me figure out what style of haircut/hairstyle I should look in to, I thought I might look to a series of internet questionnaires. I came across this – TheHairStyler.com. After answering a handful of questions – including hair-type, complexion, height and even “nose size”, the generator came up with this:

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No.

So, I abandoned this horrible and terrifying idea then went searching the internet for some lovely ideas from creative Japanese hairdressers. TO RASYSA.COM!

ImageTint: Brown Beige | Cut: Single-length bob | Length: Medium | Digital perm

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Tint: Ash | Cut: Bob | Length: Short/Medium | Digital perm

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Tint: Ash beige | Cut: Short top layer, shaggy under layer | Length: Medium | Low temperature digital perm

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Tint: Dark beige | Cut: Strong fringe, lower layers | Length: Medium | Straight permanent wave

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Tint: Lavender ash | Cut: Side-swept fringe, long layers | Length: Medium/long | Digital perm to fringe and lower layers

So many choices. Help me out folks.

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STYLE: BECAUSE YOU’RE HAIR IS REALLY BORING, JAYNE.

DAY THIRTY-ONE.

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I managed to make it to day 31 of my self-instigated post-a-day challenge. Unfortunately, this didn’t equate to 31 posts (since I sneakily missed two, possibly three posts). Oops! I sincerely apologize for my tardiness! I hope such dramatic measures will not need to be taken in the future to encourage me to post on my blog. I hope you all have enjoyed this recent posting fervour as well. I greet all my new followers with open arms! I hope the future brings more interesting content for you all to read and plenty more adventures!

x jayne

DAY THIRTY-ONE.

STYLE: HIGH VERSUS LOW? LOW VERSUS HIGH?

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It’s been ages since I have had a Converse sneaker cladding my toes. Astonishing really, when you think of how I used to ONLY wear Converse – and they were always in Optical White. Always. Now I’ve grown all old and hag-y, I’m wondering if I should change-up my ingrained fashion habits? Perhaps go high top? Although, I’m never going to leave Optical White. Some things are hard to change.

Your thoughts? Hi VS Low?

STYLE: HIGH VERSUS LOW? LOW VERSUS HIGH?

FOOD: HOME MADE ODEN TIME! おでん! おでん! おでん!

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It’s been pretty bloody cold lately in good ol’ Australia-land, so it seems logical for me to go seeking delicious comfort food to fill our bellies. Today, I finished work early and decided to hit up the grocery stores for some oden ingredients! What is oden, you may ask? Well, it’s something like a big Japanese stew – Oden (おでん) is a Japanese winter dish that consists of a conglomerate of delicious ingredients (boiled eggs, daikon radish, konnyaku, and processed fish cakes) stewed in a light, soy-flavoured dashi broth.

In Japan, and quite frankly, many other Asian countries, oden is often sold from food carts and 7-11’s in winter. Many of the Japanese and Taiwanese convenience stores that I’ve visited have had simmering gelatinous oden pots available for customers to pick-and-choose their goodies – with each bit costing a few cents (say, a large piece of daikon radish may cost you $0.50).

MAKE THE SOUP:

  • 4 cups dashi
  • 2 tablespoons sake
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

You can make your own dashi by combining dashi konbu (kelp for stock) and katsuobushi (dried bonito) but since I was a bit short on time (and let’s face it, too lazy), I decided to go for the packaged stuff. I ended up using S&B’s Oden No Moto soup stock – one sachet can make enough for 4 cups of broth. More than enough for two people to snack on. Okay, so it’s made for four. Shush.

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Once you’ve made your stock and brought it to a simmer, you can pretty much pile in anything that you wish – most people will start with daikon (lobok/white radish/white carrot) as it takes amazing if stewed for at least an hour in the pot. Note the adorable looking daikon radish I managed to pick up. Yes, I went to every grocery store I could find at the local shops (we have more than you would think a fairly small local shopping centre would hold) until I can across one sufficiently small and cute looking.

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WHAT I ADDED:

Carrot (not pictured), potatoes (not pictured), boiled eggs (not pictured), firm deep-fried tofu (not pictured), chikuwakamabokosatsuma-age, fish balls, fish tofu, daikon radish, shitaake mushrooms and shiratake noodles.

Some people like to let this stew simmer up then put it away (in the fridge) for at least a day for the flavours to seep it. Not a necessary thing, as it still tastes amazing after an hour of broiling, but if the mood takes you and you can stand the wait, go for it!

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Traditionally served up (and cooked) in as large clay pot known as a donabe, I used one of my cast iron pots and it served just as well!

Plate this up with rice, furikake (振り掛け) and an icy-cold beer or sake to make the perfect comfort-food meal! OMNOMNOM.

FOOD: HOME MADE ODEN TIME! おでん! おでん! おでん!

PATIENCE JAYNE, PATIENCE.

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Patience (or forbearing) is the state of endurance under difficult circumstances, which can mean persevering in the face of delay or provocation without acting on annoyance/anger in a negative way; or exhibiting forbearance when under strain, especially when faced with longer-term difficulties. Patience is the level of endurance one can take before negativity.

Every day, I pray for a little bit more of this.

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. (NIV) Romans 12:12 

PATIENCE JAYNE, PATIENCE.

JAPAN: KYOTO, HANATOURO (花灯路).

Even though we were in Japan too early for cherry blossom season, we were lucky enough to be in Kyoto during the Higashiyama Hanatouro (花灯路) Illuminations – a lantern festival that consist of around 2500 lanterns that line the winding path that leads to the foothills of Higashiyama Mountain. The Hanatouro Illuminations are hosted twice a year – in the winter, it’s held in Arashiyama and in the spring it’s held in Higashiyama. It incorporates many of the popular temples and shrines in the area and is a good way to pack in a visit to many of the temples and shrines in one hit – even though it is still crisp in early March. This crispness can make it hard to convince yourself to head back out into the cold at dusk, but it’s well worth it!

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Hina dolls on display as we walk up the Historic Streets of Kyoto.

We rugged up in thick coats and all the Heattech we could muster (thanks to UNIQLO) and wrapped our scarves around our noggins and headed out into the cold in search of interesting illumination. Luckily we were staying at the Hotel Granvia Kyoto – it’s a hotel that sits right on top of the Kyoto main train station (and bus station) and provided us with a great starting point for any trip out from Kyoto (and also has some of the biggest rooms I’ve ever seen in Japan). So after trekking out, we hopped on a bus bound for the Higashiyama district.
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Making our way up the preserved “Historic Streets”.

After getting off at a vague bus stop at the insistence of the bus driver (who seemed to know what we were looking for) with some equally bemused tourists from Singapore, we followed the flow of people and ended up at the Yasaka shrine (八坂神社, Yasaka Jinja, also known as the Gion Shrine). Hooray! In this area, we visited some of the larger temples and shrines and followed the path up towards Flower Lake where the Ikebana Promenade lay waiting.

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Following the lantern-clad path to Maruyama Park.

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In this area, a flower arrangement (ikebana) competition was being held – and there were some seriously strange flower arrangements going on. I mean, some involved pipes, others involved mannequins. It was pretty intense.

ImageImageImageAs we wandered further though Maruyama Park, we came across the exhibition called the Takeakari-Yugennokawa (Bamboo lanterns/Profound Stream) – where a thousand Touro lights made of young bamboo were placed on/in the Yoshimizu Stream that flows through the park. It was impossible to get a shot of this because there were so many people jostling with their cameras in tow – I didn’t particularly want my camera to end up in a watery grave, so I cautiously crossed the bridge and admired the site from afar.Image

In front of the large central weeping cherry tree in Maruyama Park (shidarezakura).

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Large lantern statues created by the temples in the area.

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By the time we had visited many of the temple sites and shrines it was quite late and we starkly realised we hadn’t had any dinner yet. It was also bone-achingly cold – so we headed into the Gion District  and sought sustenance by the way of a practically empty, but apparently quite “famous” shabu shabu restaurant (日本料理 しゃぶ禅 京都祇園店 – Nihonryourisyabuzen Kyoutogionten). Due to the extreme cold, by the time we had finished dining, we decided to take a taxi home (around 1000 yen). Fun but extremely cold!

JAPAN: KYOTO, HANATOURO (花灯路).

STYLE: NAILS THAT STOP THE PRESS.

I’ve always fostered a slightly unhealthy addiction to having colourful nails. For my own wedding I had to curb the desire to walk down the aisle with a fluorescent mass of colour adhered to my finger tips. Luckily I work in an industry that doesn’t care what colour your nails are – as we wear gloves 100% of the time (unless I’m doing data entry, gloves and typing really crap me).

Today, being a day off (thank-goodness), I finally got the time to stalk down a few things I have been looking for for a little while. Like fresh eggs. And non-date-due milk. Also, a few new and interesting nail polishes. As a nail-polishing fan, I’ve been on the search for a reasonable glitter nail polish – namely in “matt-flakes”.
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What I found was stop the press by Ulta3 – and consists of matte black and white glitters in two sizes in a clear base. Ulta 3 is a cheapie Aussie brand that can be picked up in many major pharmacies here in Oz – this sweet buy only cost me $2 and has amazing results in 1-2 coats. Unlike many glitters, stop the press doesn’t go on ridiculously thin. With a little coaxing, you can even get a pretty good glitter-effect with a single coat.ImageOne coat. Please excuse my manky nails.ImageTwo coats. Ew, my nails are so manky. D:Image
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I paired this with one of Ulta3’s cream polish colours – a neon orange – tangelo twist that was I given at Christmas last year. The result? Jason pollock fabulous nails. I also bought Ulta3’s over the rainbow – which is choc-a-block with a myriad of coloured glitters. Can’t wait for an excuse to try it out!

STYLE: NAILS THAT STOP THE PRESS.